What is a Kimono and Yukata?

What is a Kimono?/ What is a Yukata?

While a Kimono is a long, loose traditional Japanese robe with wide sleeves, tied with a sash. A garment similar to a kimono worn elsewhere as a dressing gown. This is a Japanese tradition and it is really important to wear at festivals made from other people or made from students at school. The kimono (きもの) (着物?)is a traditional garment. The word “kimono”, which actually means a “thing to wear” (ki “wear” and mono “thing”), has come to denote these full-length robes. The standard plural of the word kimono in English is kimonos, but the unmarked Japanese plural kimono is also sometimes used. Kimono is always used in important festival or formal moments, it is the representative of polite and a very formal clothing.
A yukata is a casual kimono-like garment worn during the summer. It’s unlined and usually made of cotton to make the fabric more breathable. As such, yukata are popular for dressing up for summer events like firework festivals. But the most Japanese people that wears a Yukata is mostly boys that wears it. Yukata wearing dates back over 1,000 years to when they were worn by the nobility to and from their baths in the days before bath towels were used in Japan. Because yukata are much cheaper than silk kimono, they became very popular during the Edo period when there were strict laws that prevented people from living extravagantly.

A Yukata is what the Men’s are wearing and the Kimono’s are what the girls are wearing. But I really hope that you like looking at the pictures and you will know all the information about the difference of which one is a Kimono and what is a Yukata. Here are some examples of them, these are really important to the Japanese people and what they like to wear.

If there is something that you don’t no and you don’t have time to know what it is then you can comment below and I will help you and answer your question for you.

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